Killer sentenced to 10 years in US federal prison after UK’s longest extradition case

Phillip Harkins was sentenced to 10 years imprisonment in the US today. Harkins was originally arrested for murder in 1999 but fled to Scotland from the US after he was remanded on bail. He was then re-arrested in Scotland in 2003 after he was charged with death by dangerous driving. His 14-year extradition case, believed to be the longest in UK history, went several times to the European Court of Human Rights. On each occasion the court ruled that there was no risk that Harkins would face the death penalty due to diplomatic assurances provided by the US; and that the possibility that he would face life imprisonment without parole did not amount to a breach of Article 3 ECHR which prohibits inhuman and degrading treatment. Harkins was finally extradited to the US in 2017. Today, the US court sentenced him to 25 years for the 2 killings and 15 years for a subsequent attempted armed robbery charge. These sentences will be served concurrently and have been reduced to take into account the years he spent in prison in the UK. Overall, this means he will be spending a further 10 years in a federal prison in the US.

Greek court rejects 3rd Turkish request for extradition of 8 soldiers

For the third time, a Greek Court has rejected a request from Turkey for the extradition of 8 soldiers it accuses of being involved in the July 16 attempted coup against President Erdogan. The court found that the charges against the 8, including attempted murder, involvement in an armed terrorist group, and involvement in the coup itself, were vague and had not changed nor been supported by new evidence since Turkey’s previous 2 failed attempts to secure their extradition. It also found that they were at risk of receiving an unfair trial in Turkey, and of being subjected to inhumane treatment.